How GO-Global Works

Windows Application Publishing Without RDS

GO-Global® enables multi-user remote access to Microsoft® Windows® applications without using either Microsoft Remote Desktop Services (RDS) or the multi-session kernel functionality built into Windows. Unlike products that wrap features around RDS, GO-Global provides full replacements for Microsoft’s multi-session functionality and its Remote Desktop clients, display driver, protocol, internet gateway, and management tools. GO-Global’s unique architecture eliminates the need for RDS components to be installed on Windows desktops or servers.

In short, GO-Global is a complete virtual application delivery and remote application access solution, for both Windows desktops and servers, using 100% GraphOn® technology with no dependence on the features or architecture used by other vendors.

Starting GO-Global-Published Applications

When accessing Windows applications published via the GO-Global Web App, end users simply click the application link in their browser window. The browser connects to a web server and the Application Publishing Service and downloads and runs the GO-Global Web App, which launches the application. Administrators specify how the application opens; for example, whether the application fills the browser window or displays inside the browser alongside other content. Administrators can also direct the application to load a specific document or display a specific image or form when the user clicks the application link.

If the GO-Global App is installed on the client device, the application can run outside the browser window as if it were running locally and can access local files and devices.

 

GO-Global Published Application Architecture

After starting up, the GO-Global Web App opens a WebSocket connection to the Application Publishing Service (APS) on the host. The APS creates the user session by calling the GO-Global System Extensions Driver (GGSE), which loads the Win32 subsystem, the GO-Global Virtual Display Driver, and the session-specific drivers. The APS then starts the session’s logon.exe process and the application requested when the end user clicked on the browser link.

As the end user works in the published application, the application calls Windows OS modules (e.g., GDI32, User32, etc.) to perform various functions. GO-Global directs those calls to that session’s instance of the Win32 subsystem. For graphics-related functions, for example, the Win32 subsystem will send graphics commands to the GO-Global Virtual Display Driver, which runs in the session’s logon.exe process. GO-Global directs those calls to that session’s instance of the Win32 subsystem. For graphics-related functions, for example, the Win32 subsystem will send graphics commands to the GO-Global Virtual Display Driver.

Published Application APIs, SDKs, and Integration

GO-Global’s extensive APIs enable Managed Service Providers (MSPs), Hosted Service Providers (HSPs), and Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) to extend GO-Global’s functionality and the functionality of their products and services. For example, using GO-Global’s APIs, MSPs, HSPs, and ISVs can programmatically manage GO-Global hosts and sessions and can develop features that enable host-side applications to interact with client-side applications and peripherals.

Windows Version Compatibility

GO-Global is continually updated for compatibility with all current versions of Windows desktop and Windows Server®. To ensure GO-Global customers do not experience interruptions when Windows Updates are applied, GO-Global’s Windows Compatibility Assurance feature automatically defers installation of Windows Updates until they have been verified by GraphOn as compatible.